My Picture Story Book of England – Part 2, Cambridge

The Geldart, Cambridge

The Geldart, Ainsworth St Cambridge

After we (temporarily) took our leave of our Kentish friends Bill and I were off to Cambridge. This time we were visiting ‘B’ who met her partner ‘E’ when she was staying with us in Sydney years ago. Now she is a mum with two young daughters, and is in the process of returning to her career as a music teacher. It was great to catch up with them all. I am not keen on posting photos of other people’s children unless they know in advance, so what I will show of that visit is the pub of which ‘E’ is the Landlord – so make sure you drop in and have a pint and a meal next time you are in Cambridge. Check out the interesting decor of vinyl records and music paraphernalia and listen to some live music also.

 

Book Sculptures outside the Cambridge University Library

Book Sculptures outside the Cambridge University Library

The next day, Sunday, we went off exploring Cambridge on our own. There was plenty of activity of students arriving to start their study year, and the markets were on too. So much to look at: streetlife, tudor style buildings, and the grandeur of the various colleges, including Trinity, in whose courtyard we lingered for a while. There was even a street protest on climate change (I think), and also a wedding. As part of our ramblings, we walked out the to Cambridge University Library as I wanted to see the Literature of the Liberation Exhibition. It was a bit off the beaten track and quite a long walk, and when we finally found the place, it was, of course, closed. So I consoled myself with a photo of the pylons along the footpath – metal sculptures of books piled on top of each other.

 

Cambridge Punts Waiting

Cambridge Punts Waiting

Thanks to a suggestion by fellow blogger Agnes Ashe, we sought out the Cambridge Punts, and had a cruise down the Cam River to see the backs of the colleges. Our guide, a student himself, hails from Cambridge but studies in Leeds, and this was the last day of his summer job. On the 21st September, the day we took the punt, autumn was signalling its arrival by turning the ivy on the walls a magenta red (if that is a colour – sorry Agnes if I have mixed up my palette).

 

We finished off the day with a visit to The Fitzwilliam Museum, the arts and antiquities museum of the University of Cambridge. We managed to come in through a side entrance, so I was quite smitten when we ended our tour at the grand main entrance. There is a lot to see in this museum, so you have to make a decision what you will concentrate on. In this case, I chose to dawdle amongst the Egyptology, including mummies and their coffins. I see from their website that they also have a section on manuscripts and printed books, which I completely missed. Fiddle.

If you think we had a big day, it was nothing as compared to ‘B’, who took the two girls – one of whom is only around thirteen months and a very lively power packet – on the train to London for a day out with their Auntie. A big effort indeed, and I bet we were in bed before they were!

28 thoughts on “My Picture Story Book of England – Part 2, Cambridge

  1. Hi – have only just cone across your site – and am loving exploring your writing. As a ‘hovering-on-the-edge-of-a-decision-to-retire’ like minded soul, I’ll follow your musings with interest. Loved the travel section – but you missed the best place when you came to the UK – that’ll be The Isle of Man, the rock on which I write – https://writingonarock.wordpress.com/ – maybe you’d find a few minutes to check it out? This is my favourite piece – https://writingonarock.wordpress.com/2017/08/16/house-clearance-a-short-story-hope-you-enjoy-it/ Bye for now! J.

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    • Ah yes, in all my different times in England, I have never got to the Isle of Man. Even though I worked in the Lake District on several occasions. Never got to Scotland either, but that’s a different story. Thanks for coming on board with my blog, and I will be returning the compliment. I commented on the story separately. It’s really good!

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    • Ah, it’s just a little point and shoot camera, and I can’t even see in the viewfinder when the sun is shining. Nothing like the depth and clarity of another blogger’s photos I have just been admiring. But in any case ours are a good memento, and I am glad you enjoyed them. I still have to post about Oxford, which was also great, but on the whole I enjoyed Cambridge more.

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  2. Hi Gwendoline
    Look forward to reading more stories – especially after the Paris sojourn and Norma is going to have a detailed read of your Cambridge story as she was there just in October.

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  3. What a lovely description of Cambridge and all you can – you quite make me want to go on a punt again!
    I’d forgotten what a busy day we had on the train etc. We have been again since and I drove, which was surprisingly easy (I am always a little tentative to drive in London). So we will NOT be going on the train again for quite some time! I think I’m scarred.

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    • Hahaha, I don’t think you can even consider the children + punt at this stage. That little Sofia of yours will be water-skiing before you even know she has jumped overboard. I am glad you have worked out how to use the car, as it means you will probably be prepared to visit your sister more often than if you had to organise the train journey again.

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    • At HK airport waiting for connecting flight home and reviewing all the comments I seem to have missed while immersed in my Paris course. You are right, it is a great museum, and not overwhelming as some can be. The Egyptology was very interesting.

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  4. Sounds like a great outing and I would love to visit Cambridge one day so thanks for the ideas. It also looks like a great time of year to have been there with the excitement of a student population in the streets. What a gorgeous ivied wall – perfect for an ivy league town. Great photos.

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    • Hi! I am sitting at Hong Kong airport waiting to catch connecting flight home to Sydney and catching up with blog comments. I think I must have missed replying to yours earlier. So sorry! I’m glad you liked that post. I also have another to put up from our trip to Oxford. That was even busier with students – we couldn’t get inside any of the colleges. And there is probably plenty more ivy in those shots – the red/gold of autumn misses all us Aussies who live on the coast.

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  5. So glad you decided to try out the punting and the photos look great. Pleased to see nobody ended up in the water! The Fitzwilliam is a treat isn’t it? I always think it is a manageable size not so daunting as the V&A or the British Museum in London. Forgot to mention the Scott Polar Research Institute which has a fascinating small museum – don’t know if you made it there, but next time maybe.

    Am looking forwards to your thoughts on Paris after all your strolling and thinking and plotting (maybe). I see they’ve just reopened the Picasso Museum after five years. Lucky you, good time to be in Paris. Agnes

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    • Whenever I get so behind in the blog posts as I am now, I can never decide whether just to go “oh dash it” and move on to posting about what is happening NOW. But I am (a) a logical thinker – leftover from logistics career, and (b) don’t want to confuse the reader more than necessary. So it looks as if Bradford and the Lakes will pre-empt Paris in the short term, in terms of blogging. Hopefully all will be revealed in due course 🙂 I did miss the Scott Polar, as you say, another time.

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      • I look forward to Bradford and the Lakes along with Paris in whatever order your literary creative juices take you. Hope your course is fuelling you for your next writing endeavour. It’s always good to be learning in a new/different environment – I think it makes you see afresh.

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        • The course is finished now Agnes, and I am waiting at HK airport for connecting flight and catching up on blog comments. It was a very busy 3 weeks in Paris. I’ll have a lot of writing to do when I get home, not only the blog, but I will try to start on the next project. I’ve got some ideas how to tackle it, but no doubt it will finish up quite differently.

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          • Wishing you a safe journey home and looking forwards to ‘the next project’. Just from listening to various authors talking about their craft it appears that many of them start off with one idea in mind and end up creating a completely different work – especially when key characters begin to ‘fly’ and take on a life of their own! Both exciting and daunting??

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