Languishing (or liquifying?) in Lublin

Lublin Castle

Lublin Castle

The weather has been hot for weeks now.   At first we did not take much notice being as how we come from a hot climate.  Now even we are getting overheated and sticky, and we are definitely slowing down, Our enthusiasm is waning.  Our rendition of “I love to go a wandering, along a mountain track,” has lost its spark.  Our wandering is more of a trudge than a purposeful meander.

Waddy stuffing down lunch as he waits for the train to Lublin

Waddy stuffing down lunch as he waits for the train to Lublin

Our hotel is on the right of this picture, just inside the entrance gate to the old town

Our hotel is on the right of this picture, just inside the entrance gate to the old town

Old town street scene

Old town street

As a consequence, we don’t do as much in Lublin as Professor Bob had in mind for us, but as the weather is heat wave conditions from their perspective, so he understands our need to rest.
Lublin is a Polish city that is not so much on the tourist route.  It has a charming old city that was once a thriving Jewish quarter, and it is easy to wander around, as it is quite small and not so busy. (Particularly in the heat).  True to form, Waddy has us booked right in the centre of the old town, just a few steps inside the entrance gate.
Outside the gate, just down the road, stands Lublin Castle.  This has a chequered history as an army barracks, monastery, 19th century prison, then a Nazi prison and later a communist stronghold.  Now it houses an extensive museum.  All manner of Polish folk culture and history is on display.
Painting showing St Peter on one angle

Painting showing St Peter on one angle

But the painting becomes the madonna from another angle

But the painting becomes the madonna from another angle

The main exhibition is the Chapel of the Holy Trinity.  Every wall is covered in frescos, possibly the finest medieval wall paintings in Poland.  They date back to the 15th century and have a unique characteristic, as they combine the Russian orthodox and Catholic imagery.

Just one part of the fresco wall, it goes all around the walls and ceiling in this manner

Just one part of the fresco wall, it goes all around the walls and ceiling in this manner

We spent a morning in this museum, and capped off our visit by climbing the castle tower.  This gives a 360degree view of Lublin.  Lublin is a large city, boasting several universities for example, and the view from the top of the tower provides a interesting contrast of the old town versus the socialist town.  Soviet era apartment blocks line the horizon.
Old town on one side of the tower

Old town on one side of the tower

Communist era apartment blocks on the skyline

Communist era apartment blocks on the skyline

Professor Marek (Bob to us) is a talented and passionate individual.  We were privileged to visit his University and to look at his important project teaching visually impaired children, and in developing ‘tactile graphics’ and other resources.  Jay is our resident expert in that field, and I have asked if she will write a guest post on our visit.  It will take a little time for her to put it together, but please watch this space!
Professor and Mrs Marek

Professor and Mrs Marek

Saturday 27th – Monday 29th July 2013, Garrulous Gwendoline, Lublin Poland

5 thoughts on “Languishing (or liquifying?) in Lublin

  1. Pingback: Guest Post from Jay in Lublin: Professor Marek and his “Hungry Fingers” | The Reluctant Retiree

  2. Hi Agnes. Sorry for the delay. I wanted to give you the correct info. The frescoes were discovered under flaking plaster by a painter in 1899. Subsequent efforts to restore the frescoes were interrupted by the First World War. Later events and the microclimate also had a detrimental effect on the restoration. In 1976 the plan for the final restoration was determined and the chapel opened to the public twenty years later in 1997 . GG

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  3. Another fascinating post. Beautiful frescoes. They look in really good condition for their age and geographical location – have they been quite heavily restored/maintained? Agnes

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